PARTNERSHIPS

We help communities build sustainable language solutions

The Language Conservancy has, since 2005, created dozens of successful partnerships with language communities across the United States, Canada, and Australia. We highly value building relationships with Indigenous groups and our priority remains constructing a network of languages revitalized across the world.

Visit our TLC Canada, TLC Australia, and Consorcio de Lenguas en Riesgo websites to learn more about our latest projects.

UNITED STATES & CANADA

The Language Conservancy began working with the Apache Language Consortium in 2017 to produce a dictionary of the various dialects of the Arizona Apache Language. In 2018 that partnership expanded to include the San Carlos Apache Tribe. In 2019, in partnership with Arizona State University and San Carlos Apache College, TLC held the first-ever Apache Summer Institute. Preparations are already underway for the 2020 session of what will become an annual tradition. TLC recently released a Level I Arizona Apache Textbook and work continues on the Arizona Apache Dictionary, as well as the first-ever Apache-language children’s books, and a Vocab Builder.

In 2014 The Language Conservancy partnered with the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation in North Dakota. That same year witnessed the First Annual MHA Summer Institute. The following year saw the release of an Arikara Vocab Builder app and an Arikara Mobile Keyboard. In 2016, we made available the Arikara Level 1 Textbook. The following year saw the Fourth Annual MHA Summer Institute and the publication of an Arikara Alphabet Workbook, an Arikara Alphabet Coloring Book, an Arikara Media Player app and the children’s book Prairie Dog Goes to School alongside the Arikara Dictionary.

As part of the NENAS (North East Native Advancing Society) Curriculum Project, TLC’s leading language revitalization experts have begun to develop picture books which will be available to all language learners, with particular emphasis on pre-school and elementary aged children. Each picture book will be culturally appropriate and will support language learning in the classroom and at home.

TLC has begun development on two elementary picture books for the Plains Beaver community as part of the NENAS (North East Native Advancing Society) Curriculum Project. These educational stories introduce readers to foundational grammar and vocabulary and equip early learners with the tools they need to achieve fluency in their target language.

The Language Conservancy partnered in 2018 with the Kainai First Nation of the Blackfoot Confederacy in Alberta, Canada. That year, we developed a Level 1 poster series for the elementary classroom. Plans are now in the works for a Blackfoot Winter Institute to train educators to teach the language using best methods to immerse children in the Blackfoot language and get them speaking.

The Language Conservancy partnered in 2016 with Saint Labre Indian School in Montana to develop a Northern Cheyenne Level 1 Textbook. The Northern Cheyenne Language Consortium was founded in 2018. The effort to revitalize the language has seen the release of the Northern Cheyenne Vocab Builder app and several children’s books. The Consortium is now working to produce the first textbooks for the language alongside the Northern Cheyenne Online Audio Dictionary, and mobile apps for the Northern Cheyenne Dictionary and the Northern Cheyenne Media Player.

The Language Conservancy collaborated briefly with Fresno State University on an online dictionary for the Chukchansi people of California.

The Language Conservancy partnered with the Cowlitz Indian Tribe in 2019. The first stage of the revitalization of the Cowlitz language, now underway, includes laying the groundwork for an easily accessible, online dictionary.

TLC is recently released two beginner level pictures books, and accompanying videos, for the Moose Cree First Nation which introduce learners to a wide range of elementary vocabulary and familiarizes them with basic principles of grammar, such as prepositions and conjugation.

As part of the NENAS (North East Native Advancing Society) Curriculum Project, TLC’s leading language revitalization experts have begun to develop picture books which will be available to all language learners, with particular emphasis on pre-school and elementary aged children. Each picture book will be culturally appropriate and will support language learning in the classroom and at home.

The Language Conservancy works with schools and organizations on the Crow Indian Reservation in Montana to develop language revitalization solutions for the Crow (Apsáalooke) language. TLC has partnered with the native-led Crow Language Consortium to develop and publish resources for the Crow Language. These include the Crow Language Levels 1, 2, and 3 Textbooks and over half a dozen children’s books with more on the way. Work continues on the Crow Dictionary, already available online in draft.

TLC also assists with coordination of the Crow Summer Institute. This annual event provides teacher training aimed at improving language teaching capacity in schools, training a new generation of instructors for efforts like the Chickadee Lodge Immersion School, which now instructs 60 children, from Kindergarten through second grade. TLC continues to work with local Crow organizations to develop additional components key to building a thriving language infrastructure.

The Language Conservancy partnered with Dakhóta Iápi Okhódakičhiye in 2014. That same year saw the release of the Santee Dakota Level 1 Textbook. Work is currently underway for a Dakota Mobile Dictionary app and a Level 2 Textbook. A Dakota Summer Institute is planned for 2020.

The Language Conservancy partnered with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in 2015. The Yanktonai Dakota Level 1 Textbook and the Yanktonai Dakota Vocab Builder app became available in 2017.

The Language Conservancy partnered with the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments in northeastern Alaska in 2019. A Rapid Word Collection in June 2019 gathered 2,303 verbs and brought the Gwich’in community together under the common goal of language revitalization.

The Language Conservancy partnered in 2014 with the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation in North Dakota. That year also saw the First MHA Summer Institute. The Hidatsa Levels 1, 2, and 3 Textbooks and Audio CDs soon followed, as well as a Hidatsa Alphabet Coloring Book and six Hidatsa children’s books, including Prairie Dog Goes to School, The Buffalo and the Boat, and The Fox Who Saw His Own Shadow. The Hidatsa Language Project also saw the release of a Hidatsa Vocab Builder app, Hidatsa Mobile Keyboard, a Hidatsa Media Player app, and the Hidatsa Dictionary. The fourth MHA Summer Institute took place in 2017, followed by a one-week Hidatsa Language Workshop in 2018.

The Language Conservancy partnered with the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin in 2019 for a Rapid Word Collection. Held in July and August 2019 in Black River Falls and Mauston, Wisconsin, we collected a solid 12,592 words over the course of an intensive ten-day workshop. This archive of words will form the foundation for developing further language resources for the Ho-Chunk language.

The Language Conservancy began working in 2019 with the Tlowitsis Nation of British Columbia to revitalize the Kwak’wala language. Production continues on the first edition of the Kwak’wala Online Dictionary. Planning is also underway for the next stage of the dictionary, the recording and inclusion of audio pronunciations of the words.

The Language Conservancy began working with the Lakota Language (Lakȟótiyapi) in 2005. Through the course of over a decade and a half, we have collaborated with the Lakota Language Consortium to produce more than 100 titles for the Lakota Language. Our native partners include the Oglala Sioux Tribe, The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe. The first Lakota Summer Institute took place in 2007. Since then, it has not only grown to become an annual tradition, but since 2018 has moved to take place in two separate locations. Lakota Summer Institute South takes place in South Dakota and Lakota Summer Institute North in North Dakota.

Visit the LLC Bookstore to browse all of our Lakota products!

The Language Conservancy began working in 2019 with the Oromocto First Nation in New Brunswick, Canada to revitalize the Maliseet (Wolastoqey) language. In 2020, TLC released the Maliseet Media Player as well as two children’s picture books. The accompanying YouTube videos are in production.

The Language Conservancy partnered with the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma in 2013. That year saw the release of the Maskoke Language Level 1 Textbook and Audio CD. Two years later, the Maskoke Level 2 Textbook and Audio CD followed.

The Language Conservancy partnered in 2017 with the Mohegan Tribal Council of Elders to explore the production of a Mohegan Dictionary and a children’s alphabet coloring book.

The Language Conservancy partnered in 2016 with the Fort Peck Tribes in Montana to produce a Vocab Builder app. In 2018, TLC partnered with Assiniboine bands in Canada including Carry the Kettle First Nation, Ocean Man First Nation, and Mosquito, Grizzly Bear’s Head, Lean Man First Nation. Plans are currently underway to organize a Language Summit, where the community can come together to determine the next steps for language revitalization.

In 2019, The Language Conservancy partnered with the Stoney Nakoda First Nation and Stoney Education Authority in Alberta, Canada.  In September and October 2019, the Stoney Nakoda Rapid Word Collection harvested 14,002 words that will enable the creation of further resources to revitalize the language. Plans are underway for developing a Nakota Online Dictionary project as well as a level 1 textbook, a vocab builder app, a coloring book, and three children’s picture books.

The Language Conservancy partnered with North Slavey in 2019 to produce a Vocab Builder app.

The Language Conservancy officially partnered in 2018 with Wisconsin-based nonprofit Grassroots Indigenous Multimedia in 2018. GIM has published more than 12 Ojibwe-language titles as well as several works in English about Ojibwe. In 2019, The Language Conservancy helped produce and distribute a new book, Pazahiyayewin’s Story of Bdote.

The Language Conservancy partnered with the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska and the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska in 2016. The first annual Omaha-Ponca Summer Institute took place in 2017 at Nebraska Indian Community College. That year also saw the release of the Omaha-Ponca Level 1 Textbook, Audio CD, and the Omaha-Ponca Vocab Builder app. In 2019, The Language Conservancy facilitated the third annual Omaha-Ponca Summer Institute.

The Language Conservancy began work with the Oneida language in 2018 by holding a summit on the state of the Oneida language. A Level 1 Textbook is currently in progress, and planning is underway for an Oneida Digital Dictionary.

As part of the NENAS Project (North East Native Advancing Society), the Language Conservancy will help to increase student language proficiency among the Saulteaux First Nation by creating a series of children’s books which will provide a strong foundation of materials for the language.

The Language Conservancy partnered in 2019 with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe for a Rapid Word Collection in April. The ten-day event collected 5,208 words. Documenting these words lays the foundation needed to develop future language learning materials, a pivotal step to rebuilding the language.

AUSTRALIA

In 2019, The Language Conservancy began working with the Malak Malak Indigenous people of the Northern Territory of Australia on the Malak Malak language. Efforts are currently underway to produce a Vocab Builder app and to release several children’s picture books in 2020.

As of 2020, The Language Conservancy has begun working with the Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre to develop a Ngarluma Vocab Builder which provides an important step in producing high-quality teaching materials in the Ngarluma language for use in schools and at home.

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Language is the lifeblood of culture and the core of identity. When indigenous people are able to maintain or learn their languages, they are healthier and more successful.

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